LMAO: Lighthearted, Merry, Amusing, Outrageous!

With premises as outrageous as a secret underground Chinese chess enclave and a truly magical strain of weed, this collection of comic short films are somewhat like life as viewed in a funhouse mirror. While they’re guaranteed to make your smile, these shorts also offer fresh perspectives on navigating our way through modern life.

This film program is available internationally.

Q&A LIVE on 11/8 at 5:30 P.M. EST

In this program


Becoming Eddie still

Becoming Eddie

Directed by Lilan Bowden

In 1985 suburban America, a Korean American boy named Yong has trouble fitting in with his classmates, who only see him as a foreigner. In an effort to become popular, Yong makes a wish to become his idol, the world’s most famous foul-mouthed comedian. But when his wish comes true, it brings unexpected results.

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Dragon Style

Directed by Luka Chin

Columbus Park, Chinatown, NYC. Yuyu, an avid Chinese Chess player, must confront herself, her grandpa and a piece of soap to save the park from being turned into a doggie yoga studio.

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The Trouble With Cats

Directed by Tim Schafer

“The Trouble with Cats” follows two sisters, Deena and Mina, through the perils of modern dating in this alternate fantasy world, where we find that they face problems not unlike our own.

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In Sync

Directed by Eddie Shieh

A young couple walk a fine line while thriving in an open marriage until they catch each other breaking their own rules.

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Logan Lee & The Rise of the Purple Dawn

Directed by Raymond Lai

Just your average Asian-American, coming-of-age, sci-fi, hip-hop stoner comedy about a scratch DJ who discovers a strain of marijuana that allows him to see that certain people are actually intergalactic soul-sucking cyborgs. You know the drill.

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The Blessing

Directed by Liann Kaye

When a timid, midwestern boy decides to propose to his girlfriend, he has to go through her immigrant, Chinese mother first.

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Curtain Call

Directed by Angel Yau

All the moments I have been on stage in childhood and what that has taught me.